Tag Archives: Feast Days

On the Feast of the Nativity (Dec. 25/Jan. 7)

On December 25/January 7 every year, we celebrate the Nativity of our Lord and God and Savior Jesus Christ. This day is an important one for humankind. For on this day the eternal God, who had deigned to take on human flesh in order to save us from the power of Death, is born into time and space. On this day we celebrate His birth to the Theotokos in a cave. We recognize Joseph’s obedience to God’s messengers in the midst of doubt. We remember the shepherds who were the first to know the Good News of His birth when the Angels of God announced it to them. Thus, “the least of these” were granted great mercy. We remember the Magi whose love for and intense study of creation revealed the Good News to them in a manner so convincing that they acted on it and traveled to a foreign land to pay homage to a King they’d never even heard of before. In them, “the wealthy” and “the foreigners” were granted great mercy as well. We recall how nature (for example, the star and the animals in the cave) proclaimed and honored His birth. We observe that Life can come from the depths of the earth, for in a cave our Lord was born, and again later, in a cave, humanity is born into life eternal when He conquers Death and rises from the dead.

It is likely that our children are already familiar with the story of this feast. Let us teach them where to find it in the Scriptures, in Luke chapter 2. As we read this passage aloud together, we find opportunities to discuss the things mentioned above. We can also take a look at the icon of the feast as we read. We can challenge our children to identify different parts of the scripture passage as they are found in the icon. We can talk with our children about the feast and its importance. Once we have established the importance of the day, we should take some time to discuss what we will do on the day of the feast, and together agree on how we can have our actions focus on celebrating the feast itself, not just bending to societal trends and expectations. This can be difficult, especially if we have established so many other Christmas lower-case-t-traditions in our family. Even a little step towards celebrating the feast is a step in the right direction, and will be worth the effort!

The feast will be upon us soon. Let us prepare and celebrate as we should. Blessed Nativity to you and your family!

Here are some ideas of ways to learn together about the Nativity Feast:

 

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Find descriptions of the icon of the Nativity at these links:
Click on parts of the icon  to read about them here: http://www.antiochian.org/icons-explained-nativity

See the icon and descriptions about each part of it here: http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/70/62/e2/7062e21a4c0a4cc5358ffe18586bf7fb.jpg

You may wish to create some Nativity icon ornaments to use at home or give as gifts. Here is one idea of a way to do so: http://orthodoxeducation.blogspot.com/2011/11/christmas-orthodox-craft-ornaments.html

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Does your family have a Christmas tree? Have you talked together about how some of its symbolisms can point us to the true meaning of the Nativity Feast? In the feast’s pages in the book “Heaven Meets Earth,” there is a section dedicated to the many symbols of the Christmas tree. For example, “God’s light, symbolized by the lights sparkling all around the tree, reaches into the deepest, darkest crevices of our being.” (p. 20) If your family enjoys simple crafts, consider making paper Christmas trees. To make one, first accordian-fold a large green paper circle to make a “tree” shape. Then decorate it with markers, tiny paper icon “ornaments,” etc. Add two star stickers (back to back) at the top of the “tree.” Use a hole punch to punch holes from the fold side of each of the accordian folds of the tree. Set the tree over an led votive (many dollar stores sell them two to a pack) so that the tree can “light up.” When your tree(s) are finished, review again the symbolisms mentioned in the book, looking for each on your paper tree and your Christmas tree (if you have one).

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Keeping our focus (and our children’s focus) on Christ during the Nativity “season” is not always easy in today’s world. Find resources to help in this blog post: https://orthodoxchristianparenting.wordpress.com/2015/12/16/ideas-for-keeping-our-focus-on-the-nativity-of-christ/

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“Each Christmas we need to ask ourselves and our families what we should get Christ. It is His birthday after all.” ~ Melissa Tsongranis, in her article “What Shall We Offer?”, which pushes us to continue to think about how to keep Christ as the focus of our Nativity celebration. http://www.goarch.org/archdiocese/departments/family/articles/offering

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Find pins to many Nativity ideas here: https://www.pinterest.com/aodce/nativity/

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This zine can help us teach our children ages 12 and up about the Nativity of our Lord. http://www.goarch.org/archdiocese/departments/religioused/zines/nativityzine. There is a free parent guide featuring suggested ways to use it with children of different age levels; ideas for celebrating the twelve days of Christmas; and information about Christmas celebrations around the world, as well! http://www.goarch.org/archdiocese/departments/religioused/christmas_guide (You can also get a teachers’ guide to use with the zine, with these objectives: http://www.goarch.org/archdiocese/departments/religioused/resources/midhightextobjectives#For to Us)

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With older children, we can take time before the Nativity Feast’s vesperal service/Royal Hours to discuss the verses we will hear and/or chant. For example this one:

“O Christ what shall we offer You;
for our sake You appeared on earth as man?
Every creature made by You offers thanks to You.
The angels offer You a hymn; the heavens, a star;
the Magi, gifts; the shepherds, their wonder;
the earth, its cave; the wilderness, the manger:
and we offer You a Virgin Mother.
O pre-eternal God, have mercy on us.”


Find the rest of the vesperal service here: http://lit.royaldoors.net/. Watch your children during the service, to see their faces light up in  recognition when this verse that you have discussed is chanted in the service!

On the Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple (Nov. 21 or Dec. 4)

On Nov. 21 (or Dec. 4) we celebrate the Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple. This feast celebrates the day when the Theotokos, still a child, went to the Temple. The background story to this event is pretty important:

Joachim and Anna were devout Jews who loved God very much. They lived on only a third of their income, tithing and giving away the rest. Yet they had no child. They promised God that they would give their child back to Him, if He would grant them one, and He blessed them with the gift of their daughter Mary.

When Mary was three years old, and finally weaned, Joachim and Anna did not forget their promise to God. They gathered young ladies with candles to walk with them, and all together walked to the Temple so that they could present Mary to God and give her back to Him. Many family and friends came along, as well, all carrying lit candles.

When they arrived at the Temple, Joachim and Anna lifted Mary up onto the first of the 15 steps that led up into the temple. As soon as she was on that step, she ran all the way up the rest of them. The High Priest at the time was Zachariah (who later became the father of St. John the Forerunner). Zachariah greeted Mary at the top of the steps, took her by the hand, and led her into the Temple. The Holy Spirit directed him as he led her not just into the Temple, but into the “Holy of Holies,” the most sacred part of the Temple (which was so holy that only the High Priest could go in there; and he could only go in once a year after much preparation and prayer!)!

The Most-holy Virgin lived in the Temple for many years. The angels fed her in the Holy of Holies. As long as they lived, Joachim and Anna came regularly to the Temple to visit their daughter. When they departed this life, she stayed on in the Temple until she was betrothed to Joseph.

The holiness that she acquired while in the Temple, along with her own piety and desire to follow God, prepared the Most-holy Virgin to become the new Temple, in which God Himself dwelt. Her willingness to come to the Temple with such joy is a notable part of the Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple.

Most Holy Theotokos, intercede for our salvation!

Here are some resources and ideas for learning about the feast together as a family:
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Find the story of the feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple, along with its related hymns and an explanation of the details in the icon here: http://www.goarch.org/special/listen_learn_share/vmpresentation/index_html
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Listen to Fr. Thomas Hopko of blessed memory’s explanation of the importance of the Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos to the Temple in this podcast: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oOpQ9N24Z0

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This 5-minute video encourages each person watching it to prepare their hearts for the coming of Christ just as the Theotokos was prepared to receive Him when she entered and lived in the temple.The video shows icon after icon, as the narrator explains the Entrance of the Theotokos to the temple and its implications for us. Older children will benefit from watching it with you: https://youtu.be/VhuF_9JSz6s

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This blog post suggests two books that can be used to teach young children about the Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple. It also contains links to a printable lineart icon of the feast, as well as a craft idea that the family can do together.  http://www.charmingthebirdsfromthetrees.com/2009/11/entrance-of-theotokos-into-temple.html
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The Theotokos entered into the temple to prepare herself to become the living temple of God. We, too, are to become the living temple of God. After sharing the story of the Entrance of the Theotokos to the Temple, talk together about what she did and how we can do the same to prepare ourselves to receive Christ. (For example: 1. Her parents gave her to God. Has that happened in your family? How? 2. She went to the temple with her family. Do you do so as well? How often? 3. She ran into the temple because she was happy to be there. Are we happy when we go to church? etc.) (If you need inspiration before leading this family discussion, you may want to read this: http://www.saintspiridon.org/?p=658.)

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This blog post offers a glimpse into one family’s celebration of the Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos to the Temple. We especially liked the idea of creating a timeline of icons of the Feast Days, and having the children create a brief description (or even a sketch, if they are not yet writing) to post on that timeline: http://illumination-learning.com/main/2015/02/16/feast-days-entrance-of-the-theotokos-into-the-temple/

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Print this foldable centerpiece about the Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple on a piece of cardstock. As a family, work together to decorate and assemble it. Set it as the centerpiece of your dining room table, add it to your icon corner, or set it somewhere else where you will see it often and remember the feast. http://www.antiochian.org/sites/default/files/assets/asset_manager/cacb8660b29bdc97f8e8283ff567634e.pdf

On the Feast of the Triumphal Entry Into Jerusalem (Palm Sunday)

Exactly one week before Pascha, we celebrate one of the 12 Great Feasts of the Holy Orthodox Church: The Feast of the Triumphal Entry Into Jerusalem. Let us take a moment to think about Christ’s entry into Jerusalem and compare it to His greater triumph at the other end of that same week. When He entered Jerusalem, our Lord had to some degree, everything that many people want out of life: He had the acclaim and respect of others; He was well known; and people gave Him the very coats off of their backs to welcome Him as they would have welcomed a king. How interesting it is to note that in His humility, our Lord turned all of this attention on its head by riding into town on the back of an “unclean” donkey, all the while appearing (to some, at least) to be ready to free His people and set up His kingdom! Although He knew what lay ahead for Him, He came willingly to Jerusalem. He did not hesitate.

By the end of that same week, our Lord had been stripped of everything (literally) and was treated in a way that no person ever wants to (or should!) be treated. He was ignored, mocked, beaten, and then, finally, cruelly killed. Once again, He turned all of this on its head. This time, however, He “rode” into Hades on the “back” of a cross, and destroyed Death by His death, bringing life to the entire world, freeing us all from Death, and opening the doors to His Kingdom to all. And again, He did not hesitate! And our world – indeed, our very LIVES – will never be the same!

It is important that we help our children learn about this feast, because of what it conveys to us about Christ and His Kingdom. It is easier to ponder Christ’s kingship when we think about all of those people waving palm branches and laying down their coats to welcome Him as He rode by. The depth of His humility is evident when we learn that donkeys were at that time considered to be unclean, and yet He deliberately chose to ride one. The Triumphal Entry shows us that Christ’s Kingdom is not of this world. He could have had an amazing earthly kingdom, but He chose something infinitely better, the Kingdom of Heaven, and then did everything that He could to free us from our chains so that we can be part of it. But that’s a festal celebration for another day.

Blessed is He that cometh in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!

 

Here are ideas of ways that you and your family can learn more about this important feast:

Celebrate the Feast of the Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem by decorating your dining room table with this pop-up centerpiece: http://www.antiochian.org/sites/default/files/assets/asset_manager/d5aa72ed369c7b1fc58ddd93ebde329a.pdf. Add some of the palms that you bring home from church, after the service,  to add to the display.

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“As Jesus begins His journey on the road to the Cross, it becomes apparent that most people don’t want the kind of salvation He brings. He doesn’t conform to their expectations. Today’s world doesn’t want Jesus’ kind of salvation either. Yet like those who spread their garments before the hooves of Christ’s donkey, we are called to shed our old selves and lay them in the path that Jesus takes through our lives. We can do no less than throw open the gates of our hearts. The Conqueror of Death—and everything that leads to it— is coming.” “Heaven Meets Earth; Celebrating Pascha and the Twelve Feasts,” p. 37, http://store.ancientfaith.com/heaven-meets-earth

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Find a family lesson focusing on the Gospel reading for the Triumphal Entry here: http://www.goarch.org/archdiocese/departments/family/files/lent/gospels/palmsunday. This lesson offers some information about the feast, as well as ideas of activities to do together as a family to continue learning about the feast.

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The latest issue of “Little Falcons” Orthodox Christian children’s magazine is called “Palm Sunday.” It contains articles about the Feast; traditions from the different jurisdictions of the Church (such as palms vs. pussy willows; a bit about Lazarus Saturday in a Serbian church and Palm Sunday in an Antiochian one); a woman’s diary entry from fourth century Spain that explains how the feast was celebrated at that time; an excerpt from a book imagining what the Triumphal Entry was like from the donkey’s perspective; directions for folding palm crosses; and much more! Find out how you can get your own copy here: http://www.littlefalcons.net/

*Before Holy Week begins, take some time to listen in on this very helpful webinar about preparing your family for Holy Week: https://youtu.be/lX3UyHAKMac

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Create Learning Boxes for young children to investigate during Holy Week: http://www.sttheophanacademy.com/2011/04/revisiting-pascha-learning-boxes.html

On Theophany

On January 6 (January 19 for those following the old calendar) Orthodox Christians celebrate Theophany. What exactly does the term “Theophany” mean? In case you didn’t know, Theophany means “the manifestation of God.” It is the perfect name for this day: for, indeed, Christ was revealed to the world at His baptism.

Why is Theophany so important? (It is the third greatest feast, after Pascha and Pentecost, even greater than the Nativity Feast!) It is significant for several reasons. First, it is the day in human history that marks when our Lord was baptized by John in the Jordan. More importantly, Theophany marks the point in our theological history when the Holy Trinity was revealed to the world. On Theophany, God’s voice was heard as He spoke, the Incarnate Word (Christ) was seen in the flesh as He was baptized, and the Holy Spirit was present in the form of a dove as He descended from Heaven. St. John of Damascus adds the following reasons for Theophany’s significance: “… the Lord was baptized, not because He Himself had need of cleansing, but to bury sin by water; to fulfill the Law, to reveal the mystery of the Holy Trinity, and finally, to sanctify the nature of water and offer us the form and example of Baptism.”

How can we help our children to learn more about Theophany? First and foremost, we should allow them to experience it for themselves by taking them to the services! The Divine Liturgy is celebrated, and afterwards, the service of the blessing of the waters. If we teach our children the troparion ahead of time, they can even sing along during the water blessing service. Many children enjoy this service because they love to watch their priest fling water on the icons and walls of the church, to feel the splash of Holy Water as it lands on them, and to taste the water for themselves after the service! The whole day of Theophany should contain delicious foods and a festive atmosphere, as well: it is a great Feast of the Church! Let us teach our children about it, and together celebrate with joy!

Christ is baptized! In the Jordan! Blessed Theophany to you and your household!

 

Here are additional ideas of ways to help children learn about Theophany:

Print this stand-up centerpiece to be the focus of attention on the dining table during Theophany. It has a lineart copy of the icon, a simple explanation of the feast, and the troparion on the other side! It is a great way to decorate our table while focusing on the importance of this feast:http://www.antiochian.org/sites/default/files/assets/asset_manager/aae2368f6b752c8cba042e21917405cc.pdf

Here’s a printable bulletin called “The Children’s Word,” completely dedicated to Theophany. Print it and share it with your children to help them learn more about this great feast! http://myocn.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Childrens-Word-99.pdf

Find great ways to teach your children about Theophany, including an activity with pictures from the icon, here: http://orthodoxeducation.blogspot.com/2015/01/kali-fotisi-wishes-to-you-for-good.html

Teach your children about Theophany using the definitions, links to icons (even one to color!), and other suggestions found here:http://www.theologic.com/oflweb/feasts/01-06.htm

Send a Theophany activity e-card to someone else, with well wishes for the Feast, here: http://www.hamatoura.com/GreetingCard/Greetings.php?subject=Theophany%20of%20Jesus%20Christ&link=07JesusTheophany-En

If your children enjoy crafts, consider having them decorate their own holy water bottles, with small new plastic bottles, permanent markers, and other decor (such as adhesive rhinestones, etc.). The children can take these bottles to church to have them filled with holy water for you to take home and partake of as needed. Perhaps they can even keep them in their icon corner in their room, or at the family icon corner! Here is one idea of how to decorate a holy water bottle: http://www.catholicicing.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/holy-water-bottle-craft.jpg

To learn more about Theophany, consider listening to this podcast by Fr. Thomas Hopko of blessed memory: https://orthodoxword.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/theophany-the-radiant-shining-forth.mp3

or read this blog by Elissa Bjeletich: http://blogs.ancientfaith.com/raisingsaints/teaching-theophany/

 

Gleanings from a Book: “Heaven Meets Earth – Celebrating Pascha and the Twelve Feasts” by John Skinas

Author’s note: I had other plans for this blog post. But when this book arrived in the mail this week, I knew that I had to share it with you immediately. It is THAT good. My other plans will wait!

“The Christian story is not ‘just’ a story. It is truth… that transforms, both in the telling and in the hearing. That is why we enter into the great feasts of the Church and build our lives around them. They are not mere commemorations but transforming stories, true in a way that is more profound than the bare search for ‘fact.’ And they determine not only our calendars and schedules but also the way we see and understand the world.” These words by Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick are a fitting introduction to the book Heaven Meets Earth: Celebrating Pascha and the Twelve Feasts. The book itself was written by John Skinas, and published by Ancient Faith Publishing this year. Orthodox Christians of all ages will savor and learn much from it.

The pages of this beautiful book are full of information and personal challenges related to each of the 12 Feasts of the Church as well as Pascha. Each feast has several pages dedicated to it. The first spread features the icon of the feast (with a details from the icon pointed out in footnotes), the story behind the feast, and related scriptures. The following pages highlight Old Testament connections, a church or landmark in the world related to the feast, the festal hymns, a quote from the Church Fathers, some Festal Traditions, and personal challenges in both the “Think About It” and the “Where are You?” sections. The pages are colorfully illustrated with icons, photos, and related graphics. Each page is a feast for the eyes as well as the mind.

Regardless of the age of the reader, this book will help to nurture a love for the great feasts of the Church. Young children will pour over the beautiful icons and pictures. Older children will enjoy finding connections to the book of “things we sing and hear at church.” Teens and adults will find a plethora of information about each feast. Everyone can be challenged to think about the feast and will find ways to become a better Christian while celebrating that feast. Heaven Meets Earth is an invaluable resource that will be well-loved and much-used in an Orthodox Christian home.

This book belongs in your family’s prayer corner! Find it here: http://store.ancientfaith.com/heaven-meets-earth

The Antiochian Orthodox Department of Christian Education offers free printable standup centerpieces that can be used with each of the feasts. They would work well alongside this book, to help you and your family celebrate the feasts. Read about them here: https://orthodoxchristianparenting.wordpress.com/2014/08/13/introducing-a-resource-feast-day-stand-up-centerpieces/

Find additional information about the 12 feasts in these places: http://www.antiochian.org/twelve-great-feasts; http://www.goarch.org/ourfaith/ourfaith8713; and http://oca.org/FSicons-churchyear.asp?Section=twelvefeasts, among others.

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Here is a sample quote from each feast’s pages:

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Nativity of the Theotokos (Sept. 8): “Salvation is near! The first feast of the liturgical year celebrates our new beginning. Mary, the Mother of God, is born, bringing great joy to her parents and hope to the world. It is here that the story of her Son’s Incarnation and our liberation from sin and death begins, since it is in Mary that the Lord will find a place to dwell when He comes down from heaven.” (p. 7)

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Elevation of the Cross (Sept. 14): (from the “Where are you?” section) “The excitement of the new liturgical year may already be gone, and maybe we’ve slid back into our old sinful ways. The Church holds the Cross up to remind us of our calling.” (p. 13)

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The Entrance of the Theotokos (Nov. 21): (from the “Old Testament Connection” section)“The Ark of the Covenant contained: The word of God written in stone; manna that came down from heaven; the rod of Aaron that miraculously budded without water. The Theotokos, the New Ark, contained: The Word of God Himself in the flesh; the Bread of Life who came down from heaven; the Seedless Flower that sprang from the Root of Jesse.” (p. 16)

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The Nativity of Christ (Dec. 25): “Jesus the Messiah is wrapped in swaddling clothes that resemble His death shroud; the manger is the same shape as is tomb; the cave of His birth resembles the cave of His burial. Church Fathers such as Ephraim the Syrian emphasize that God the Word was made flesh so that He could enter Hades and leave it powerless, freeing us from sin and death forever.” (Festal Icon footnote #1; p. 18)

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The Theophany of Christ (Jan. 6): (from the “Festal Tradition” section) “…In joyful continuation of Christ’s act of sanctification, priests immerse a cross into a container of water three times… The priests sprinkle water in every direction, blessing churches, people, and all of creation…. Through this cleansing, Christ continues making everything new…. This is also the season when priests bless the homes of the faithful, reminding us that hour home life should never be separate from our church life; it all belongs to Christ, who has sanctified the waters through His Baptism for the life of the world.” (p. 24)

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The Meeting of the Lord in the Temple (Feb. 2): (from the “Think About It” section) “In preparing to meet Christ, Simeon and Anna stayed connected to the temple, to scripture, to God… every Sunday we meet Christ more intimately than Simeon and Anna could have imagined: in the Eucharist… Appropriately, Simeon’s famous words are used not only at the end of the day, but also after Holy Communion. Having united with Christ, we can ‘depart in peace’ to wherever God calls us to go.” (p. 29)

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The Annunciation (March 25): “In the days of the creation of the world, when God was uttering His living and mighty ‘let there be,’ the word of the Creator brought creatures into the world. but on that day, unprecedented in the history of the world, when Mary uttered her brief and obedient, ‘so be it,’ I hardly dare say what happened then — the word of the creature brought the Creator into the world.” ~ St. Philaret of Moscow (p. 32)

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The Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem: (from the “Old Testament Connection” section) “Jerusalem was crowded with visiting Jews who had come to celebrate Passover (Pascha in Greek), the commemoration of their deliverance from slavery and death in Egypt. Little did they know that this man whom they hailed as their deliverer from slavery to the Romans was entering the city as the Passover lamb being led to slaughter. This sacrifice will release them from their slavery to sin and the eternal death that results from it.” (p. 36)

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Pascha: The Resurrection of Christ: (from the “Where Are You?” section) “Pascha is the highlight of our liturgical year, the feast so great that without it the twelve feasts would lose their light and meaning. No matter where any of us find ourselves, there is nothing to fear now. ‘The Light has shone forth, awakening those who sleep in darkness and turning tears into joy.’ All we have to do is reach out, and Christ will pull us into His everlasting glory.” (p. 45)

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The Ascension of Christ: “For forty days, since Pascha, Christ has been appearing to His disciples, eating with them, showing them His wounds, testifying to the accomplishment of His Crucifixion and proving the reality of His Resurrection. Now they stand watching as the Son of God ascends, raising earth up to meet heaven.” (p. 47)

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Holy Pentecost: (from the “Festal Tradition” section) “Pentecost is the gift Jesus gives to His bride. We’ve received something even greater than the Law; we’ve received the grace of the Spirit of God. Now we are called to be faithful to our Bridegroom.” (p. 52)

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The Transfiguration of Christ (Aug. 6): (from the “Think About It” section) “Even Christ’s clothing shines brightly, showing that everything and everyone connected to Him can shine with His light. In fact, this is our calling: to shine with heavenly beauty in a darkened world.”

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The Dormition of the Theotokos (Aug. 15): “The way in which Christ is holding her soul, wrapped in swaddling clothes, reminds us of the icons in which Mary is holding her Child. Christ is now accepting Mary on behalf of heaven in the same way that she accepted Him on behalf of earth.” (Festal Icon footnote #3, p. 58)

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“Each year, our spiritual journey around this circle of feasts is meant to bring us closer to the One who is at its center, the One who calls us to let His Light shine through our being in an endless day of brightness and joy.” (p. 61)

 

Schools are a Tool (Judy Pappoff)

Summer has drawn to a close. Most parents and children are adjusting to the beginning of a new school year. Hair is freshly cut and styled; shopping for school clothes, shoes and supplies is done. Children are getting familiar with new teachers and/or new schools. With all this accomplished, the children are set for success, right? Not necessarily! This is only the beginning.

The liturgical year of our Church also begins in September. This is the time we begin anew. Can we merely begin our church year with the correct supplies, intentions, and clothing appropriate for Church? Of course not! We need to live the life of the Church, involved in prayer, services, and feast days throughout the entire year. Our church year is not complete if we do not participate all the way though. Similarly, we need to stay involved in our children’s school year all the way through. This is true both for secular school and for church school.

Our society in general seems to think that it is the responsibility of the school system to educate our children. And it seems that many Orthodox parents believe that their children will learn all they need to know about the Church in church school. I propose a change to this way of thinking.

Schools are a tool for us to use in the education of our children. Parents are the orchestrators of the children’s education. School plays a large role, but what the children learn at home is far more important to both their earthly knowledge and to their eternal salvation. We parents need to supplement and enhance what our children are taught at school. We need to set the stage for their learning by nurturing their curiosity. We need to be models – icons – for our children. How? Ask what was discussed in class. Share what you are learning about your faith. Ask what they are curious about. Volunteer to help out.

Be at church with your children. Pray together with your children. And, most importantly, be the kind of Orthodox Christian that you want your child to grow up to be.

Reprinted from Faith and Family (Sept 2001 pg 19). Used by permission of the author.